Members' Online Book: Navigation and Marine Electronics, Chapter 12 of 20

Marine Electronics Recommendations—Radar

Radar was useful on the day this picture was taken, but vital two days later when we transited the same area in thick fog.

Radar was useful on the day this picture was taken, but vital two days later when we transited the same area in thick fog.

Radar is, at least to Phyllis and me, the most important piece of marine electronics on our boat. Yes, more important than GPS or a chart plotter—we know how to find our position without GPS and we can navigate on paper charts, but neither of us can see in the dark or have x-ray vision to penetrate fog.

We also find radar’s ability to accurately measure the distance to an object and gauge if it’s moving, and if so how fast and in what direction, invaluable—humans are really lousy at this.

So, before we move on, I need to make clear that these recommendations are for those of you with similar needs to ours: radar is mission critical.

(Also, if you have not read them already, you need to stop here and read this chapter and this one too.)

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Meet the Author

John

John was born and brought up in Bermuda and started sailing as a child, racing locally and offshore before turning to cruising. He has sailed over 100,000 miles, most of it on his McCurdy & Rhodes 56, Morgan's Cloud, including eight ocean races to Bermuda, culminating in winning his class twice in the Newport Bermuda Race. He has skippered a series of voyages in the North Atlantic, the majority of which have been to the high latitudes. John has been helping others go voyaging by sharing his experience for twenty years, first in yachting magazines and, for the last 12 years, as co-editor/publisher of AAC.

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