Online Book: Weather Reception and Analysis, Chapter 7 of 15

How To Look Ahead—Way Ahead


Used correctly, and coupled with some effort to understand high altitude steering winds, GRIBS can be used to predict weather trends a surprisingly long way in the future. And that can substantially increase your enjoyment of cruising. This chapter will show you how.

Online Book: Weather Reception and Analysis, Chapter 11 of 15

It’s A Forecast, Not A Prophecy


In the last chapter I wrote about the importance of understanding the weather systems in a wide area around you rather than just looking at a GRIB or forecast for your immediate area. I believe this is so important that I'm going to write about another storm to drive the point home.


It is now pretty likely that Hurricane Earl will give us high winds here on the south-western shore of Nova Scotia. However, a deviation of just 50 miles either side of the forecast track will likely make the difference between us experiencing gale force versus hurricane force winds. And that in turn will determine whether [...]

Hurricane Resources


I have lived most of my life in the direct line of fire of Atlantic hurricanes, first in Bermuda, and now on the southern shore of Nova Scotia. But no matter how familiar I am with the damned things, or perhaps because of that familiarity, I always have a slight feeling of constant tension at [...]

Online Book: Weather Reception and Analysis, Chapter 12 of 15

Managing Ocean Currents

Jenifer's Clark's Gulfstream chart

I have written a lot about weather up to this point in the book, but in many cases routing for the combination of the prevailing weather and any current or tide can be the most important contributor to a comfortable and safe passage. In this chapter I look at a real Gulfstream passage and discuss what to look for.